Dead Vibrations Explore the Darker Side of Swedish Shoegaze — Bandcamp Daily

Dead Vibrations. Stockholm’s Sodermälm, often shortened to “Söder,” which is Swedish for “south,” is a neighborhood that was home to famous Swedes (Greta Garbo spent her childhood there), and famous fictional Swedes (Mikael Blomkvist, the journalist searching for sinister answers in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). But it’s also prime real estate for up-and-coming […]

via Dead Vibrations Explore the Darker Side of Swedish Shoegaze — Bandcamp Daily

How negative dig by the British press became the label for a music genre more popular today than when the shoegaze term was coined…

Labeling theory is the theory of how the self-identity and behavior of individuals may be determined or influenced by the terms used to describe or classify them.

“Shoegazing was a joke at the time but I love the fact that it is a term that has been reclaimed by people who love a bunch of bands that never got to be in the mainstream.” — Neil Halstead, Slowdive’

See, Shoegaze, an Oral History — http://www.wonderingsound.com/feature/shoegaze-oral-history-slowdive-ride-lush/

Big Star – Live In Memphis at the New Daisy Theater circa ’94 (rel. Nov. 2K14)

MI0003804801 Big Star

When Big Star played the New Daisy Theatre in Memphis, Tennessee on October 29, 1994 it was a concert designed as a homecoming farewell show of an unexpected reunion tour. Three days later, the group played Los Angeles, the earliest indication that this one-off reunion would wind up a going concern. Many more concerts would come, along with a brand new album, but that 1994 Memphis show was something special because it was the only Big Star reunion show to be filmed in its entirety. Twenty years later, Omnivore released the set as both a CD and a DVD called Live in Memphis (the one difference is that “Fire” is on the CD, not the DVD, but as it’s a 36-second clip, it’s not much of a loss). The closest cousin to Live in Memphis is Columbia: Live at Missouri University 4/25/93, a record that captured the first gig of this early-’90s reunion. It has nearly an identical set list, right down to the closing cover of Todd Rundgren‘s “Slut,” but this finds space for a couple of other covers — a throw-away of “The Girl from Ipanema” and “Patty Girl,” an obscure 1967 B-side from the teenage guitar pop group Gary & the Hornets — but the real difference is that the band is tighter, stronger, better than they were on the somewhat tentative Columbia. Here, it’s possible to hear the band gelAlex Chilton and Jody Stephens found a balance with Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow, something that’s obvious by the group’s subsequent history, but on this spirited show you can hear the gears fall into place and that’s worth the price of admission, perhaps more than once.

[See, http://www.allmusic.com/album/live-in-memphis-mw0002750770%5D

The Jesus and Mary Chain Announce “Psychocandy” 30th Anniversary North American Shows.

The Jesus and Mary Chain Announce Psychocandy North American Shows

Celebrating the 30th anniversary of the classic album

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05-01 Toronto, Ontario – Canadian Music Week
05-03 Detroit, MI – St Andrew’s Hall
05-05 Chicago, IL – Riviera
05-07 Dallas, TX – The Bomb Factory
05-09 Austin, TX – Levitation (Austin Psych Fest)
05-11 Denver, CO – Ogden Theatre
05-13 Vancouver, British Columbia – Vogue Theatre
05-14 Seattle, WA – Showbox
05-16 San Francisco, CA – Warfield

Empire shows that commanding the dying music industry is an impossible task.

http://www.vox.com/2015/1/8/7513499/empire-review-fox

It’s not impossible for disenfranchised kids to make music. In fact, its easier than ever. Any kid can become a YouTube star, theoretically. Though that won’t likely lead to becoming a leather-couch-owning, golden-record-touting record titan, it isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Lucious’s view of what it takes to become a hip-hop artist is hopelessly out of touch, ignoring the Yung Leans and Kendrick Lamars of the world. But there’s also so much inherent drama in the balance between making money from art in a time when no one’s quite sure how to do that.

Despite tackling all of these issues, Empire is fun, soapy, and ridiculous in the way only primetime television can be. But if we’re being honest, the music industry is just as soapy and ridiculous. In music, the business and the personal endlessly mix together. In that regard, Empire is absolutely successful.