Dead Vibrations Explore the Darker Side of Swedish Shoegaze — Bandcamp Daily

Dead Vibrations. Stockholm’s Sodermälm, often shortened to “Söder,” which is Swedish for “south,” is a neighborhood that was home to famous Swedes (Greta Garbo spent her childhood there), and famous fictional Swedes (Mikael Blomkvist, the journalist searching for sinister answers in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). But it’s also prime real estate for up-and-coming […]

via Dead Vibrations Explore the Darker Side of Swedish Shoegaze — Bandcamp Daily

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Why is UK-Based Daily Fantasy Sports Site FanDuel Only Now Applying For A License in the UK …?

Los Angeles, CA — November 6, 2015

Endemic gaming blogs are now reporting and FanDuel itself has confirmed that it is now applying for a gambling license in the UK vis-a-vis fantasy sports gaming.  See, e.g., http://www.legalsportsreport.com/5900/fanduel-uk-gambling-license/?utm_content=buffer93674&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Why Now?  (Especially given the fact that FanDuel is — and has been for some time — a UK-based gaming company that has not ever previously offered its DFS services to customers / markets beyond the US and Canada) Because the US market has become increasingly cloudy on the legal and regulatory front – as simple as that.

While the US market for DFS has not and will not likely be entirely shut down, it is now abundantly clear that it’s going to be a potpourri of State-by-State regulations and with uncertainty as to ring-fenced intra-state gaming activity versus inter-state customer pooling and resulting liquidity via State to State compact, and all with the possibility of Federal Intervention lurking ominously in the background — currently during an election year in the US.
Of course, FanDuel could have made this move years ago.  The same could be said for its chief competitor Draft Kings.  But, as is the case in many an eCommerce industry (or brick and mortar for that matter), the threat of regulatory activity and possibility of legal enforcement often hastens the moves of companies who have yet to diversify, divest, and divulge.
Strategic business maneuvering is more art than science.   Here the creativity, while somewhat tardy, is still artistic.
–IJI
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How negative dig by the British press became the label for a music genre more popular today than when the shoegaze term was coined…

Labeling theory is the theory of how the self-identity and behavior of individuals may be determined or influenced by the terms used to describe or classify them.

“Shoegazing was a joke at the time but I love the fact that it is a term that has been reclaimed by people who love a bunch of bands that never got to be in the mainstream.” — Neil Halstead, Slowdive’

See, Shoegaze, an Oral History — http://www.wonderingsound.com/feature/shoegaze-oral-history-slowdive-ride-lush/

Empire shows that commanding the dying music industry is an impossible task.

http://www.vox.com/2015/1/8/7513499/empire-review-fox

It’s not impossible for disenfranchised kids to make music. In fact, its easier than ever. Any kid can become a YouTube star, theoretically. Though that won’t likely lead to becoming a leather-couch-owning, golden-record-touting record titan, it isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Lucious’s view of what it takes to become a hip-hop artist is hopelessly out of touch, ignoring the Yung Leans and Kendrick Lamars of the world. But there’s also so much inherent drama in the balance between making money from art in a time when no one’s quite sure how to do that.

Despite tackling all of these issues, Empire is fun, soapy, and ridiculous in the way only primetime television can be. But if we’re being honest, the music industry is just as soapy and ridiculous. In music, the business and the personal endlessly mix together. In that regard, Empire is absolutely successful.